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Intro­duc­tion and overview

We have written this data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on (version 01.03.2022–121955385) in order to provide you with the General Data Pro­tec­tion Regu­la­ti­on (EU) 2016/679 and app­li­ca­ble national laws to explain which personal data (data for short) we as the con­trol­ler — and which pro­ces­sors com­mis­sio­ned by us (e.g. providers) — process, will process in the future and what legal options you have. The terms used are to be unders­tood as gender-neutral.
In short: We inform you com­pre­hen­si­ve­ly about data that we process about you.

Privacy state­ments usually sound very technical and use legal jargon. This data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on, on the other hand, is intended to describe the most important things as simply and trans­par­ent­ly as possible. As far as trans­pa­ren­cy is conducive, technical terms are explained in a reader-friendly manner, links to further infor­ma­ti­on are provided and graphics are used. We are thus informing you in clear and simple language that we only process personal data in the course of our business acti­vi­ties if there is a cor­re­spon­ding legal basis. This is certainly not possible if you make the most concise, unclear and legal-technical state­ments possible, as they are often standard on the Internet when it comes to data pro­tec­tion. I hope that you find the following explana­ti­ons inte­res­ting and infor­ma­ti­ve and that you may find some infor­ma­ti­on that you did not already know.
If you still have questions, we would like to ask you to contact the respon­si­ble person named below or in the imprint, to follow the links provided and to look at further infor­ma­ti­on on third-party websites. Our contact details can of course also be found in the imprint.

app­li­ca­ti­on area

This data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on applies to all personal data processed by us in the company and to all personal data that companies com­mis­sio­ned by us (pro­ces­sors) process. By personal data we mean infor­ma­ti­on within the meaning of Art. 4 No. 1 GDPR such as a person’s name, e‑mail address and postal address. The pro­ces­sing of personal data ensures that we can offer and bill our services and products, whether online or offline. The scope of this privacy policy includes:

  • all online presences (websites, online shops) that we operate
  • Social media appearan­ces and email communication
  • mobile apps for smart­pho­nes and other devices

In short: The data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on applies to all areas in which personal data is processed in a struc­tu­red manner in the company via the channels mentioned. If we enter into legal rela­ti­ons­hips with you outside of these channels, we will inform you sepa­r­ate­ly if necessary.

In the following data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on, we provide you with trans­pa­rent infor­ma­ti­on on the legal princi­ples and regu­la­ti­ons, i.e. the legal basis of the General Data Pro­tec­tion Regu­la­ti­on, which enable us to process personal data.
As far as EU law is concerned, we refer to REGULATION (EU) 2016/679 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of April 27, 2016. You can of course read this EU General Data Pro­tec­tion Regu­la­ti­on online on EUR-Lex, the gateway to the EU ‑Right, under Read https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/DE/TXT/?uri=celex%3A32016R0679.

We only process your data if at least one of the following con­di­ti­ons applies:

  1. Consent (Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR): You have given us your consent to process data for a specific purpose. An example would be storing the data you entered on a contact form.
  2. Contract (Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. b GDPR): In order to fulfill a contract or pre-con­trac­tu­al obli­ga­ti­ons with you, we process your data. For example, if we conclude a sales contract with you, we need personal infor­ma­ti­on in advance.
  3. Legal obli­ga­ti­on (Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. c GDPR): If we are subject to a legal obli­ga­ti­on, we process your data. For example, we are required by law to keep invoices for accoun­ting purposes. These usually contain personal data.
  4. Legi­ti­ma­te interests (Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR): In the case of legi­ti­ma­te interests that do not restrict your fun­da­men­tal rights, we reserve the right to process personal data. For example, we need to process certain data in order to be able to operate our website securely and eco­no­mi­c­al­ly. This pro­ces­sing is therefore a legi­ti­ma­te interest.

Other con­di­ti­ons such as the per­cep­ti­on of record­ings in the public interest and the exercise of official authority as well as the pro­tec­tion of vital interests do not usually apply to us. If such a legal basis should be relevant, it will be shown in the appro­pria­te place.

In addition to the EU regu­la­ti­on, national laws also apply:

  • In Austria, this is the federal law for the pro­tec­tion of natural persons when pro­ces­sing personal data (Data Pro­tec­tion Act), in short DSG.
  • In Germany, the Federal Data Pro­tec­tion Act, in short BDSGapplies.

If other regional or national laws apply, we will inform you about them in the following sections.

Contact details of the person responsible

If you have any questions about data pro­tec­tion, you will find the contact details of the person or body respon­si­ble below:
SEACAM
Harold Hordosch
Conrad von Höt­zen­dorf­stras­se 40
8570 Voitsberg, Austria

Email: office@seacam.com

Telephone: +43 3142 22 88 50

Imprint: https://www.seacam.com/de/impressum/

storage period

The fact that we only store personal data for as long as is abso­lute­ly necessary for the provision of our services and products is a general criterion for us. This means that we delete personal data as soon as the reason for the data pro­ces­sing no longer exists. In some cases, we are legally obliged to store certain data even after the original purpose has ceased to exist, for example for accoun­ting purposes.

If you wish your data to be deleted or revoke your consent to data pro­ces­sing, the data will be deleted as quickly as possible and provided there is no obli­ga­ti­on to store it.

We will inform you below about the specific duration of the respec­ti­ve data pro­ces­sing, provided that we have further infor­ma­ti­on on this.

Rights according to the General Data Pro­tec­tion Regulation

According to Article 13 GDPR, you have the following rights to ensure that data is processed fairly and transparently:

  • According to Article 15 GDPR, you have a right to infor­ma­ti­on as to whether we are pro­ces­sing your data. If this is the case, you have the right to receive a copy of the data and to be informed of the following information: 
    • for what purpose we carry out the processing;
    • the cate­go­ries, i.e. the types of data that are processed;
    • who receives this data and if the data is trans­fer­red to third countries, how security can be guaranteed;
    • how long the data is stored;
    • The existence of the right to rec­ti­fi­ca­ti­on, erasure or restric­tion of pro­ces­sing and the right to object to processing;
    • that you can complain to a super­vi­so­ry authority (links to these aut­ho­ri­ties can be found below);
    • the origin of the data if we did not collect it from you;
    • whether profiling is carried out, i.e. whether data is auto­ma­ti­cal­ly evaluated in order to create a personal profile for you.
  • According to Article 16 GDPR, you have the right to have the data corrected, which means that we must correct data if you find any errors.
  • According to Article 17 GDPR, you have the right to erasure (“right to be forgotten”), which spe­ci­fi­cal­ly means that you can request the erasure of your data.
  • According to Article 18 GDPR, you have the right to restric­tion of pro­ces­sing, which means that we may only store the data but not use it further.
  • According to Article 19 GDPR, you have the right to data por­ta­bi­li­ty, which means that we can provide you with your data in a common format upon request.
  • According to Article 21 GDPR, you have a right of objection, which, after enfor­ce­ment, will result in a change in processing. 
    • If the pro­ces­sing of your data is based on Article 6 Paragraph 1 Letter e (public interest, exercise of official authority) or Article 6 Paragraph 1 Letter f (legi­ti­ma­te interest), you can object to the pro­ces­sing. We will then check as quickly as possible whether we can legally comply with this objection.
    • If data is used to operate direct adver­ti­sing, you can object to this type of data pro­ces­sing at any time. We may no longer use your data for direct marketing after this.
    • If data is used to operate profiling, you can object to this type of data pro­ces­sing at any time. We may no longer use your data for profiling after this.
  • According to Article 22 GDPR, you may have the right not to be subject to a decision based solely on automated pro­ces­sing (e.g. profiling).

In short: You have rights — do not hesitate to contact the respon­si­ble person listed above!

If you believe that the pro­ces­sing of your data violates data pro­tec­tion law or your data pro­tec­tion rights have been violated in any other way, you can complain to the super­vi­so­ry authority. This is the data pro­tec­tion authority for Austria, whose website can be found at https://www. dsb.gv.at/. In Germany there is a data pro­tec­tion officer for each federal state. For more infor­ma­ti­on, you can contact the Federal Com­mis­sio­ner for Data Pro­tec­tion and the Freedom of Infor­ma­ti­on (BfDI). The following local data pro­tec­tion authority is respon­si­ble for our company:

Austrian Data Pro­tec­tion Authority

Head: Mag. dr Andrea Jelinek

Address: Barich­gas­se 40–42, 1030 Vienna

Telephone number: +43 1 52 152–0

E‑mail address:
dsb@dsb.gv.at
Website:
https://www.dsb.gv.at/

Security of data processing

In order to protect personal data, we have imple­men­ted both technical and orga­niz­a­tio­nal measures. Where possible, we encrypt or pseud­ony­mi­se personal data. In this way, we make it as difficult as possible for third parties to infer personal infor­ma­ti­on from our data.

Art. 25 GDPR speaks here of “data pro­tec­tion through tech­no­lo­gy design and through data pro­tec­tion-friendly default settings” and means that one always thinks of security and cor­re­spon­ding security both with software (e.g. forms) and hardware (e.g. access to the server room). measures. If necessary, we will go into specific measures below.

TLS encryp­ti­on with https

TLS, encryp­ti­on and https all sound very technical and they are. We use HTTPS (the Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure stands for “secure hypertext transfer protocol”) to transmit data securely on the Internet.
This means that the complete trans­mis­si­on of all data from your browser to our web server is secured — nobody can “eavesdrop”.

We have thus intro­du­ced an addi­tio­nal security layer and comply with data pro­tec­tion through tech­no­lo­gy design Article 25 paragraph 1 GDPR). By using TLS (Transport Layer Security), an encryp­ti­on protocol for secure data trans­mis­si­on on the Internet, we can ensure the pro­tec­tion of con­fi­den­ti­al data.
You can recognize the use of this pro­tec­tion of data trans­mis­si­on by the small lock symbol in the top left of the browser, to the left of the Internet address (e.g. examplepage.de) and using the https scheme (instead of http) as part of our Internet address.
If you want to know more about encryp­ti­on, we recommend a Google search for “Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure wiki” to get good links to further information.

Cookies

Cookie Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: depending on the specific cookie. More details can be found below or from the manu­fac­tu­rer of the software that sets the cookie.
📓 Processed data: Depending on the cookie used. More details can be found below or from the manu­fac­tu­rer of the software that sets the cookie.
📅 Storage duration: depending on the respec­ti­ve cookie, can vary from hours to years
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit.f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What are cookies?

Our website uses HTTP cookies to store user-specific data.
In the following we explain what cookies are and why they are used so that you can better under­stand the following data pro­tec­tion declaration.

Whenever you surf the Internet, you use a browser. Well-known browsers include Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge. Most websites store small text files in your browser. These files are called cookies.

One thing cannot be denied: Cookies are really useful little helpers. Almost all websites use cookies. More precisely, they are HTTP cookies, as there are other cookies for other areas of app­li­ca­ti­on. HTTP cookies are small files that are stored on your computer by our website. These cookie files are auto­ma­ti­cal­ly stored in the cookie folder, which is basically the “brain” of your browser. A cookie consists of a name and a value. When defining a cookie, one or more attri­bu­tes must also be specified.

Cookies store certain user data from you, such as language or personal page settings. When you visit our site again, your browser transmits the “user-related” infor­ma­ti­on back to our site. Thanks to cookies, our website knows who you are and offers you the settings you are used to. In some browsers each cookie has its own file, in others such as Firefox all cookies are stored in a single file.

The graphic below shows a possible inter­ac­tion between a web browser such as B. Chrome and the web server. The web browser requests a website and receives a cookie from the server, which the browser uses again as soon as another page is requested.

HTTP cookie interaction between browser and web server

There are both first-party cookies and third-party cookies. First-party cookies are created directly by our site, third-party cookies are created by partner websites (e.g. Google Analytics). Each cookie must be evaluated indi­vi­du­al­ly, since each cookie stores different data. The expiry time of a cookie also varies from a few minutes to a few years. Cookies are not software programs and do not contain viruses, Trojans or other “pests”. Cookies also cannot access infor­ma­ti­on on your PC.

For example, cookie data can look like this:

Name: _ga
Value: GA1.2.1326744211.152121955385–9
Purpose: Dif­fe­ren­tia­ti­on of website visitors
Expiry date: after 2 years

A browser should be able to support these minimum sizes:

  • At least 4096 bytes per cookie
  • At least 50 cookies per domain
  • At least 3000 total cookies

What types of cookies are there?

The question of which cookies we use in par­ti­cu­lar depends on the services used and is clarified in the following sections of the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on. At this point we would like to briefly discuss the different types of HTTP cookies.

There are 4 types of cookies:

Strictly necessary cookies
These cookies are necessary to ensure basic functions of the website. For example, these cookies are needed if a user puts a product in the shopping cart, then continues surfing on other pages and only goes to the checkout later. These cookies do not delete the shopping cart, even if the user closes their browser window.

Appro­pria­te cookies
These cookies collect infor­ma­ti­on about user behavior and whether the user receives any error messages. In addition, these cookies are also used to measure the loading time and behavior of the website in different browsers.

Targeting cookies
These cookies ensure a better user expe­ri­ence. For example, entered locations, font sizes or form data are saved.

Adver­ti­sing cookies
These cookies are also called targeting cookies. They are used to provide the user with indi­vi­du­al­ly tailored adver­ti­sing. This can be very useful, but also very annoying.
Usually, when you visit a website for the first time, you will be asked which of these types of cookies you would like to allow. And of course this decision is also stored in a cookie.

If you want to know more about cookies and don’t shy away from technical docu­men­ta­ti­on, we recommend https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html /rfc6265, the Internet Engi­nee­ring Task Force (IETF) Request for Comments called “HTTP State Manage­ment Mechanism”.

Purpose of pro­ces­sing via cookies

The purpose ulti­mate­ly depends on the respec­ti­ve cookie. More details can be found below or from the manu­fac­tu­rer of the software that sets the cookie.

What data is processed?

Cookies are little helpers for many different tasks. Unfor­tu­n­a­te­ly, it is not possible to gene­ra­li­ze which data is stored in cookies, but we will inform you about the processed or stored data in the following data pro­tec­tion declaration.

Storage time of cookies

The storage period depends on the respec­ti­ve cookie and is specified below. Some cookies are deleted after less than an hour, others can remain stored on a computer for several years.

You can also influence the storage period yourself. You can manually delete all cookies at any time via your browser (see also “Right of objection” below). Fur­ther­mo­re, cookies that are based on consent will be deleted at the latest after you withdraw your consent, whereby the legality of storage remains unaf­fec­ted until then.

Right to object — how can I delete cookies?

You decide for yourself how and whether you want to use cookies. Regard­less of which service or website the cookies come from, you always have the option of deleting or deac­ti­vat­ing cookies or only partially allowing them. For example, you can block third-party cookies but allow all other cookies.

If you want to find out which cookies have been stored in your browser, if you want to change or delete cookie settings, you can find this in your browser settings:

Chrome: Delete, enable and manage cookies in Chrome

Safari: Manage cookies and site data with Safari

Firefox : Clear cookies to remove data that websites have placed on your computer

Internet Explorer: Delete and manage cookies

Microsoft Edge: Deleting and managing cookies

If you generally do not want any cookies, you can set up your browser so that it always informs you when a cookie is to be set. You can decide for each indi­vi­du­al cookie whether you allow the cookie or not. The procedure differs depending on the browser. It is best to look for the inst­ruc­tions in Google with the search term “Delete cookies Chrome” or “Deac­ti­va­te cookies Chrome” in the case of a Chrome browser.

Legal Basis

The so-called “Cookie Gui­de­li­nes” have been in place since 2009. It states that the storage of cookies requires your consent (Article 6 (1) (a) GDPR). Within the EU countries, however, there are still very different reactions to these direc­ti­ves. In Austria, however, this directive was imple­men­ted in Section 96 (3) of the Telecom­mu­ni­ca­ti­ons Act (TKG). In Germany, the cookie gui­de­li­nes have not been imple­men­ted as national law. Instead, this guideline was largely imple­men­ted in Section 15 (3) of the Telemedia Act (TMG).

For abso­lute­ly necessary cookies, even if no consent has been given. there are legi­ti­ma­te interests (Article 6 Para. 1 lit. f GDPR), which in most cases are of an economic nature. We want to provide visitors to our website with a pleasant user expe­ri­ence and certain cookies are often strictly necessary for this.

If cookies that are not abso­lute­ly necessary are used, this will only happen with your consent. In this respect, the legal basis is Article 6 (1) (a) GDPR.

In the following sections you will be informed in more detail about the use of cookies if the software used uses cookies.

Web­hos­ting Introduction

Web Hosting Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: pro­fes­sio­nal website hosting and operation security
📓 Processed data: IP address, time of website visit, browser used and other data. More details can be found below or from the web hosting provider used.
📅 Duration of storage: depends on the respec­ti­ve provider, but usually 2 weeks
⚖️ Legal basis: Art. 6 Para. 1 lit.f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What is web hosting?

When you visit websites today, certain infor­ma­ti­on — including personal data — is auto­ma­ti­cal­ly created and stored, including on this website. This data should be processed as sparingly as possible and only with jus­ti­fi­ca­ti­on. By the way, by website we mean the entirety of all web pages on a domain, i.e. ever­ything from the start page (homepage) to the very last subpage (like this one). By domain we mean, for example, example.de or example.com.

When you want to view a website on a screen, you use a program called a web browser. You probably know a few web browsers by name: Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox, and Apple Safari.

This web browser needs to connect to another computer where the website’s code is stored: the web server. The operation of a web server is a com­pli­ca­ted and time-consuming task, which is why this is usually taken on by pro­fes­sio­nal providers, the providers. These offer web hosting and thus ensure reliable and error-free storage of website data.

Personal data may be processed when the browser on your computer (desktop, laptop, smart­pho­ne) connects and during data transfer to and from the web server. On the one hand, your computer stores data, on the other hand, the web server also has to store data for a period of time in order to ensure proper operation.

As an illustration:

Browser and web server

Why do we process personal data?

The purposes of data pro­ces­sing are:

  1. Pro­fes­sio­nal website hosting and operation security
  2. to maintain ope­ra­tio­nal and IT security
  3. Anonymous eva­lua­ti­on of access behavior to improve our offer and, if necessary, for criminal pro­se­cu­ti­on or the pursuit of claims

What data is processed?

Even while you are visiting our website, our web server, which is the computer on which this website is stored, usually auto­ma­ti­cal­ly saves data such as

  • the complete internet address (URL) of the accessed website
  • Browser and browser version (e.g. Chrome 87)
  • the operating system used (e.g. Windows 10)
  • the address (URL) of the pre­vious­ly visited page (referrer URL) (e.g. https://www.beispielquellsite.de/vondabinichkommen.html/)
  • the hostname and IP address of the device being accessed from (e.g. COMPUTERNAME and 194.23.43.121)
  • Date and time
  • in files, the so-called web server log files

How long is data stored?

As a rule, the above data is stored for two weeks and then auto­ma­ti­cal­ly deleted. We do not pass on this data, but we cannot rule out that this data will be viewed by aut­ho­ri­ties in the event of illegal behavior.

In short: Your visit will be logged by our provider (company that runs our website on special computers (servers)), but we will not pass on your data without your consent!

Legal Basis

The law­ful­ness of the pro­ces­sing of personal data in the context of web hosting results from Article 6 Paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (pro­tec­tion of legi­ti­ma­te interests), because the use of pro­fes­sio­nal hosting with a provider is necessary to make the company safe and user-friendly on the Internet present and to be able to pursue attacks and claims from this if necessary.

There is usually a contract between us and the hosting provider for order pro­ces­sing in accordance with Art. 28 f. GDPR, which ensures com­pli­an­ce with data pro­tec­tion and gua­ran­tees data security.

Website modular systems introduction

Website Builders Privacy Policy Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: Opti­miz­a­ti­on of our service
📓 Data processed: Data such as technical usage infor­ma­ti­on such as browser activity, click­stream activity, session heat maps, as well as contact details, IP address or your geo­gra­phic location. More details can be found below in this data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on and in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on of the providers.
📅 Storage duration: depends on the provider
⚖️ Legal bases: Art. 6 (1) lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests), Art. 6 (1) lit. a GDPR (consent)

What are website building blocks?

We use a modular website system for our website. Modular systems are special forms of a content manage­ment system (CMS). With a modular system, website operators can create a website very easily and without any pro­gramming knowledge. In many cases, web hosts also offer modular systems. By using a modular system, your personal data can also be collected, stored and processed. In this data pro­tec­tion text we give you general infor­ma­ti­on about data pro­ces­sing by modular systems. You can find more infor­ma­ti­on in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­ons of the provider.

Why do we use website building blocks for our website?

The greatest advantage of a modular system is its ease of use. We want to offer you a clear, simple and well-arranged website that we can easily operate and maintain ourselves — without external support. A modular system now offers many helpful functions that we can use even without pro­gramming knowledge. This enables us to design our website according to our wishes and offer you an infor­ma­ti­ve and pleasant time on our website.

What data is stored by a modular system?

Which data is stored exactly depends of course on the website building block system used. Each provider processes and collects different data from the website visitor. However, technical usage infor­ma­ti­on such as the operating system, browser, screen reso­lu­ti­on, language and keyboard settings, hosting provider and the date of your website visit are usually collected. Tracking data (e.g. browser activity, click­stream acti­vi­ties, session heat maps, etc.) can also be processed. In addition, personal data can also be recorded and stored. This is mostly contact infor­ma­ti­on such as email address, telephone number (if you have provided it), IP address and geo­gra­phic location data. You can find out exactly which data is stored in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on of the provider.

How long and where is the data stored?

We will inform you below about the duration of the data pro­ces­sing in con­nec­tion with the modular website system used, provided that we have further infor­ma­ti­on on this. You will find detailed infor­ma­ti­on about this in the provider’s data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on. In general, we only process personal data for as long as is abso­lute­ly necessary for the provision of our services and products. It may be that the provider stores your data according to their own spe­ci­fi­ca­ti­ons, over which we have no influence.

Right to object

You always have the right to infor­ma­ti­on, cor­rec­tion and deletion of your personal data. If you have any questions, you can also contact those respon­si­ble for the modular website system used at any time. Contact details can be found either in our data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on or on the website of the relevant provider.

You can delete, disable or manage cookies that providers use for their functions in your browser. Depending on which browser you use, this works in different ways. Please note, however, that not all functions may then work as usual.

Legal Basis

We have a legi­ti­ma­te interest in using a modular website system to optimize our online service and present it in an efficient and user-friendly way for you. The cor­re­spon­ding legal basis for this is Article 6 (1) (f) GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests). However, we only use the modular system if you have given your consent.

Insofar as the pro­ces­sing of data is not abso­lute­ly necessary for the operation of the website, the data will only be processed on the basis of your consent. This applies in par­ti­cu­lar to tracking acti­vi­ties. In this respect, the legal basis is Article 6 (1) (a) GDPR.

With this data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on, we have brought you closer to the most important general infor­ma­ti­on about data pro­ces­sing. If you want to find out more about this, you will find further infor­ma­ti­on — if available — in the following section or in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on of the provider.

WordPress.com Privacy Policy

We use WordPress.com, a website con­struc­tion kit, for our website. Service provider is the American company Auto­mat­tic Inc., 60 29th Street #343, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA.

WordPress also processes your data in the USA, among other places. We would like to point out that, according to the European Court of Justice, there is currently no adequate level of pro­tec­tion for data transfer to the USA. This can be asso­cia­ted with various risks for the legality and security of data processing.

WordPress uses so-called standard con­trac­tu­al clauses (= Art. 46 Para. 2 and 3 GDPR) as the basis for data pro­ces­sing by reci­pi­ents based in third countries (outside the European Union, Iceland, Liech­ten­stein, Norway, i.e. in par­ti­cu­lar in the USA) or data transfer there. Standard Con­trac­tu­al Clauses (SCC) are templates provided by the EU Com­mis­si­on and are intended to ensure that your data also comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards if they are trans­fer­red to third countries (such as the USA) and stored there. Through these clauses, WordPress under­ta­kes to comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards when pro­ces­sing your relevant data, even if the data is stored, processed and managed in the USA. These clauses are based on an imple­men­ta­ti­on decision of the EU Com­mis­si­on. You can find the decision and the cor­re­spon­ding standard con­trac­tu­al clauses here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/dec_impl/2021/914/oj?locale=de

The Data Pro­ces­sing Agree­ments, which cor­re­spond to the Standard Con­trac­tu­al Clauses, can be found at https://wordpress.com/support/data-processing-agreements/.

You can find out more about the data processed by using WordPress.com in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on on https://automattic.com/de/privacy/.

E‑mail marketing introduction

Email Marketing Summary

👥 Affected: News­let­ter subscribers
🤝 Purpose: direct mail mail, noti­fi­ca­ti­on of systemic events
📓 Processed data: Data entered during regis­tra­ti­on, but at least the email address. You can find more details on this with the email marketing tool used in each case.
📅 Storage duration: Duration of the existence of the subscription
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What is email marketing?

In order to always keep you up to date, we also use the pos­si­bi­li­ty of e‑mail marketing. If you have agreed to receive our e‑mails or news­let­ters, your data will also be processed and stored. Email marketing is a subset of online marketing. This involves sending news or general infor­ma­ti­on about a company, product or service by email to a specific group of people who are inte­res­ted in it.

If you want to take part in our e‑mail marketing (usually via news­let­ter), you usually just have to register with your e‑mail address. To do this, fill out an online form and send it off. However, it can also happen that we ask you for your title and your name so that we can also write to you personally.

Basically, regis­tering for news­let­ters works with the help of the so-called “double opt-in procedure”. After you have regis­tered for our news­let­ter on our website, you will receive an e‑mail con­fir­ming your sub­scrip­ti­on to the news­let­ter. This ensures that you own the e‑mail address and that no one has signed up with someone else’s e‑mail address. We or a noti­fi­ca­ti­on tool used by us logs every single regis­tra­ti­on. This is necessary so that we can also prove the legally correct regis­tra­ti­on process. As a rule, the time of regis­tra­ti­on, the time of regis­tra­ti­on con­fir­ma­ti­on and your IP address are saved. In addition, it is also logged if you make changes to your stored data.

Why do we use email marketing?

Of course, we want to stay in touch with you and always present you with the most important news about our company. Among other things, we use e‑mail marketing – often just referred to as “news­let­ter” – as an essential part of our online marketing. If you consent to this or it is permitted by law, we will send you news­let­ters, system emails or other noti­fi­ca­ti­ons by email. When we use the term “news­let­ter” in the following text, we mean mainly e‑mails that are sent regularly. Of course we don’t want to bother you in any way with our news­let­ter. That’s why we always try to offer only relevant and inte­res­ting content. For example, you can find out more about our company, our services or products. Since we are always improving our offers, you will always find out via our news­let­ter when there is news or we are currently offering special, lucrative pro­mo­ti­ons. If we com­mis­si­on a service provider who offers a pro­fes­sio­nal sending tool for our email marketing, we do this in order to be able to offer you fast and secure news­let­ters. The purpose of our e‑mail marketing is basically to inform you about new offers and also to get closer to our business goals.

What data is processed?

If you become a sub­scri­ber to our news­let­ter through our website, you confirm mem­bers­hip in an email list by email. In addition to your IP address and e‑mail address, your title, your name, your address and your telephone number can also be saved. However, only if you agree to this data storage. The data marked as such are necessary so that you can par­ti­ci­pa­te in the service offered. Providing this infor­ma­ti­on is voluntary, but not providing it will result in you not being able to use the service. In addition, infor­ma­ti­on about your device or your preferred content can be stored on our website. For more infor­ma­ti­on about how we store data when you visit a website, see the Automatic Data Storage section. We record your decla­ra­ti­on of consent so that we can always prove that it complies with our laws.

Duration of data processing

If you remove your e‑mail address from our e‑mail/newsletter dis­tri­bu­ti­on list, we may store your address for up to three years on the basis of our legi­ti­ma­te interests so that we can still prove your consent at the time. We may only process this data if we have to defend ourselves against any claims.

However, if you confirm that you have given us your consent to subscribe to the news­let­ter, you can submit an indi­vi­du­al deletion request at any time. If you object to the consent per­ma­nent­ly, we reserve the right to save your e‑mail address in a blacklist. As long as you have vol­un­ta­ri­ly sub­scri­bed to our news­let­ter, we will of course keep your e‑mail address.

Right to object

You have the option to cancel your sub­scrip­ti­on to the news­let­ter at any time. All you have to do is revoke your consent to regis­tering for the news­let­ter. This normally only takes a few seconds or one or two clicks. Most of the time you will find a link at the end of each email to unsub­scri­be from the news­let­ter. If you really cannot find the link in the news­let­ter, please contact us by email and we will immedia­te­ly cancel your news­let­ter subscription.

Legal Basis

Our news­let­ter is sent on the basis of your consent (Article 6 (1) (a) GDPR). This means that we may only send you a news­let­ter if you have pre­vious­ly actively regis­tered for it. If necessary, we can also send you adver­ti­sing messages on the basis of § 7 Para. 3 UWG, provided that you have become our customer and have not objected to the use of your e‑mail address for direct advertising.

Infor­ma­ti­on on special e‑mail marketing services and how they process personal data can be found — if available — in the following sections.

Rapidmail privacy policy

We use Rapidmail on our website, a service for our email marketing. Service provider is the German company rapidmail GmbH, Augus­ti­ner­platz 2, 79098 Freiburg, Germany. You can find out more about the data processed by using Rapidmail in the privacy policy at https://www.rapidmail.at/datenschutz .

Facebook privacy policy

Facebook Privacy Policy Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: Opti­miz­a­ti­on of our service
📓 Data processed: data such as customer data, user behavior data, infor­ma­ti­on about your device and your IP address.
More details can be found below in the data pro­tec­tion declaration.
📅 Storage period: until the data is no longer useful for Facebook’s purposes
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What are Facebook tools?

We use selected Facebook tools on our website. Facebook is a social media network of the company Meta Platforms Inc. or for the European area of ​​the company Meta Platforms Ireland Limited, 4 Grand Canal Square, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin 2, Ireland. These tools allow us to offer you and people who are inte­res­ted in our products and services the best possible offer.

If data is collected and forwarded from you via our embedded Facebook elements or via our Facebook page (fan page), both we and Facebook Ireland Ltd. respon­si­ble for. Facebook is solely respon­si­ble for the further pro­ces­sing of this data. Our shared com­mit­ments have also been enshrined in a publicly available agreement at https://www.facebook.com/legal/controller_addendum. This states, for example, that we must clearly inform you about the use of Facebook tools on our site. Fur­ther­mo­re, we are also respon­si­ble for ensuring that the tools are securely inte­gra­ted into our website in accordance with data pro­tec­tion law. Facebook, on the other hand, is respon­si­ble for the data security of Facebook products, for example. If you have any questions about data collec­tion and data pro­ces­sing by Facebook, you can contact the company directly. If you address the question to us, we are obliged to forward it to Facebook.

Below we provide an overview of the various Facebook tools, what data is sent to Facebook and how you can delete this data.
In addition to many other products, Facebook also offers the so-called “Facebook Business Tools”. This is the official name of Facebook. But since the term is hardly known, we decided to just call them Facebook tools. These include, among others:

  • Facebook Pixel
  • social plugins (such as the “Like” or “Share” button)
  • Facebook Login
  • Account Kit
  • APIs (pro­gramming interface)
  • SDKs (collec­tion of pro­gramming tools)
  • Platform inte­gra­ti­ons
  • Plugins
  • codes
  • Spe­ci­fi­ca­ti­ons
  • Docu­men­ta­ti­on
  • Tech­no­lo­gy and Services

Through these tools, Facebook expands its services and has the ability to receive infor­ma­ti­on about user acti­vi­ties outside of Facebook.

Why do we use Facebook tools on our website?

We only want to show our services and products to people who are really inte­res­ted in them. With the help of adver­ti­se­ments (Facebook ads) we can reach exactly these people. In order to be able to show users appro­pria­te adver­ti­sing, however, Facebook needs infor­ma­ti­on about people’s wishes and needs. In this way, infor­ma­ti­on about user behavior (and contact details) is made available to the company on our website. As a result, Facebook collects better user data and can show inte­res­ted people appro­pria­te adver­ti­sing about our products or services. The tools thus enable tailor-made adver­ti­sing campaigns on Facebook.

Facebook calls data about your behavior on our website “event data”. These are also used for mea­su­re­ment and analysis services. Facebook can thus create “campaign reports” on our behalf about the effect of our adver­ti­sing campaigns. Fur­ther­mo­re, through analyzes we get a better insight into how you use our services, website or products. As a result, we use some of these tools to optimize your user expe­ri­ence on our website. For example, you can use the social plug-ins to share content on our site directly on Facebook.

What data is stored by Facebook tools?

By using indi­vi­du­al Facebook tools, personal data (customer data) can be sent to Facebook. Depending on the tools used, customer data such as name, address, telephone number and IP address can be sent.

Facebook uses this infor­ma­ti­on to match the data with the data it has from you (if you are a Facebook member). Before customer data is trans­mit­ted to Facebook, so-called “hashing” takes place. This means that a data set of any size is trans­for­med into a character string. This is also used to encrypt data.

In addition to the contact data, “event data” is also trans­mit­ted. “Event data” means the infor­ma­ti­on that we receive about you on our website. For example, which subpages you visit or which products you buy from us. Facebook does not share the infor­ma­ti­on it receives with third parties (such as adver­ti­sers) unless the company has explicit per­mis­si­on or is legally required to do so. “Event data” may also be linked to contact infor­ma­ti­on. This allows Facebook to offer better per­so­na­li­zed adver­ti­sing. After the matching process already mentioned, Facebook deletes the contact data again.

In order to be able to deliver adver­ti­se­ments in an optimized manner, Facebook only uses the event data if it has been combined with other data (which was collected by Facebook in a different way). Facebook also uses this event data for security, pro­tec­tion, deve­lo­p­ment and research purposes. Much of this data is trans­mit­ted to Facebook via cookies. Cookies are small text files that are used to store data or infor­ma­ti­on in browsers. Depending on the tools used and whether you are a Facebook member, a different number of cookies will be created in your browser. In the descrip­ti­ons of the indi­vi­du­al Facebook tools, we go into more detail about indi­vi­du­al Facebook cookies. You can also find general infor­ma­ti­on about the use of Facebook cookies at https://www.facebook.com/policies/cookies .

How long and where is the data stored?

In principle, Facebook stores data until it is no longer required for its own services and Facebook products. Facebook has servers all over the world where its data is stored. However, customer data will be deleted within 48 hours after it has been compared with your own user data.

How can I delete my data or prevent data storage?

In accordance with the General Data Pro­tec­tion Regu­la­ti­on, you have the right to infor­ma­ti­on, cor­rec­tion, trans­fe­ra­bi­li­ty and deletion of your data.

The data will only be com­ple­te­ly deleted if you com­ple­te­ly delete your Facebook account. And this is how deleting your Facebook account works:

1) Click Settings on the right side of Facebook.

2) Then click on “Your Facebook Infor­ma­ti­on” in the left column.

3) Now click “Deac­ti­va­ti­on and Deletion”.

4) Now select “Delete Account” and then click “Next and Delete Account”

5) Now enter your password, click on “Next” and then on “Delete Account”

The data that Facebook receives via our site is stored, among other things, via cookies (e.g. in the case of social plugins). You can deac­ti­va­te, delete or manage indi­vi­du­al or all cookies in your browser. Depending on which browser you use, this works in different ways. Under the “Cookies” section you will find the relevant links to the relevant inst­ruc­tions for the most popular browsers.

If you generally do not want any cookies, you can set up your browser so that it always informs you when a cookie is to be set. You can decide for each indi­vi­du­al cookie whether you allow it or not.

Legal Basis

If you have agreed that your data can be processed and stored by inte­gra­ted Facebook tools, this consent is the legal basis for data pro­ces­sing (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. a DSGVO). In principle, your data will also be stored and processed on the basis of our legi­ti­ma­te interest (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. f GDPR) in quick and good com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on with you or other customers and business partners. However, we only use the tools if you have given your consent. Most social media platforms also set cookies on your browser to store data. We therefore recommend that you read our privacy statement on cookies carefully and consult Facebook’s privacy policy or cookie policy.

Facebook also processes your data in the USA, among other places. We would like to point out that, according to the European Court of Justice, there is currently no adequate level of pro­tec­tion for data transfer to the USA. This can be asso­cia­ted with various risks for the legality and security of data processing.

Facebook uses so-called standard con­trac­tu­al clauses (= Art. 46 Para. 2 and 3 GDPR) as the basis for data pro­ces­sing by reci­pi­ents based in third countries (outside the European Union, Iceland, Liech­ten­stein, Norway, i.e. in par­ti­cu­lar in the USA) or data transfer there. Standard Con­trac­tu­al Clauses (SCC) are templates provided by the EU Com­mis­si­on and are intended to ensure that your data also comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards if they are trans­fer­red to third countries (such as the USA) and stored there. Through these clauses, Facebook under­ta­kes to comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards when pro­ces­sing your relevant data, even if the data is stored, processed and managed in the USA. These clauses are based on an imple­men­ta­ti­on decision of the EU Com­mis­si­on. You can find the decision and the cor­re­spon­ding standard con­trac­tu­al clauses here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/dec_impl/2021/914/oj?locale=de

The Facebook data pro­ces­sing terms, which cor­re­spond to the standard con­trac­tu­al clauses, can be found at https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms/dataprocessing /a>.

We hope we have given you the most important infor­ma­ti­on about the use and data pro­ces­sing by the Facebook tools. If you want to learn more about how Facebook uses your data, we recommend you read the data gui­de­li­nes at https://www.facebook.com /about/privacy/update.

Audio & Video Introduction

Audio & Video Privacy Policy Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: Opti­miz­a­ti­on of our service
📓 Processed data: Data such as contact details, user behavior data, infor­ma­ti­on about your device and your IP address may be stored.
More details can be found below in the relevant data pro­tec­tion texts.
📅 Duration of storage: Data is generally stored as long as it is necessary for the purpose of the service
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What are audio and video elements?

We have included audio and video elements on our website so that you can watch videos or listen to music/podcasts directly from our website. Content is provided by service providers. All content is therefore also obtained from the cor­re­spon­ding servers of the providers.

These are inte­gra­ted func­tio­n­al elements of platforms such as YouTube, Vimeo or Spotify. The use of these portals is usually free of charge, but content can also be published for a fee. With the help of these inte­gra­ted elements, you can listen to or view the respec­ti­ve content via our website.

If you use audio or video elements on our website, your personal data may also be trans­mit­ted to the service providers, processed and stored.

Why do we use audio & Video elements on our website?

Of course we want to provide you with the best offer on our website. And we are aware that content is no longer just conveyed in text and static images. Instead of just giving you a link to a video, we offer you audio and video formats right on our website that are enter­tai­ning or infor­ma­ti­ve, and ideally both. This expands our service and makes it easier for you to access inte­res­ting content. Thus, in addition to our texts and images, we also offer video and/or audio content.

What data does Audio & Video items saved?

When you visit a page on our website that has an embedded video, for example, your server connects to the service provider’s server. Your data will also be trans­fer­red to the third-party provider and stored there. Some data is collected and stored regard­less of whether you have an account with the third party or not. This usually includes your IP address, browser type, operating system and other general infor­ma­ti­on about your device. Fur­ther­mo­re, most providers also collect infor­ma­ti­on about your web activity. This includes session duration, bounce rate, which button you clicked or which website you use to use the service. All this infor­ma­ti­on is usually stored via cookies or pixel tags (also called web beacons). Pseud­ony­mi­zed data is usually stored in cookies in your browser. You can always find out exactly which data is stored and processed in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on of the respec­ti­ve provider.

Duration of data processing

You can find out exactly how long the data is stored on the servers of the third-party providers either below in the data pro­tec­tion text of the respec­ti­ve tool or in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on of the provider. In principle, personal data is only processed for as long as is abso­lute­ly necessary for the provision of our services or products. This usually also applies to third-party providers. In most cases, you can assume that certain data will be stored on third-party servers for several years. Data can be stored for different lengths of time, espe­cial­ly in cookies. Some cookies are already deleted after leaving the website, others can be stored in your browser for several years.

Right to object

You also have the right and the option to revoke your consent to the use of cookies or third-party providers at any time. This works either via our cookie manage­ment tool or via other opt-out functions. For example, you can also prevent data collec­tion by cookies by managing, deac­ti­vat­ing or deleting the cookies in your browser. The law­ful­ness of the pro­ces­sing up to the revo­ca­ti­on remains unaffected.

Since the inte­gra­ted audio and video functions on our site usually also use cookies, you should also read our general data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on on cookies. You can find out more about the handling and storage of your data in the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­ons of the respec­ti­ve third-party providers.

Legal Basis

If you have agreed that your data can be processed and stored by inte­gra­ted audio and video elements, this consent is the legal basis for data pro­ces­sing (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. a DSGVO). In principle, your data will also be stored and processed on the basis of our legi­ti­ma­te interest (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. f GDPR) in quick and good com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on with you or other customers and business partners. However, we only use the inte­gra­ted audio and video elements if you have given your consent.

YouTube privacy policy

YouTube Privacy Policy Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: Opti­miz­a­ti­on of our service
📓 Processed data: Data such as contact details, user behavior data, infor­ma­ti­on about your device and your IP address may be stored.
More details can be found below in this data pro­tec­tion declaration.
📅 Duration of storage: Data is generally stored as long as it is necessary for the purpose of the service
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What is YouTube?

We have embedded YouTube videos on our website. This allows us to present you with inte­res­ting videos directly on our site. YouTube is a video portal that has been a sub­si­dia­ry of Google since 2006. The video portal is operated by YouTube, LLC, 901 Cherry Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066, USA. If you call up a page on our website that has an embedded YouTube video, your browser auto­ma­ti­cal­ly connects to the YouTube or Google servers. Various data are trans­mit­ted (depending on the settings). Google Ireland Limited (Gordon House, Barrow Street Dublin 4, Ireland) is respon­si­ble for all data pro­ces­sing in Europe.

In the following we would like to explain to you in more detail which data is processed, why we have inte­gra­ted YouTube videos and how you can manage or delete your data.
On YouTube, users can view videos, rate them, comment on them and upload them them­sel­ves free of charge. Over the past few years, YouTube has become one of the most important social media channels worldwide. In order for us to be able to display videos on our website, YouTube provides a code snippet that we have embedded on our site.

Why do we use YouTube videos on our website?

YouTube is the video platform with the most visitors and the best content. We strive to offer you the best possible user expe­ri­ence on our website. And of course inte­res­ting videos should not be missing. With the help of our embedded videos, we provide you with addi­tio­nal helpful content in addition to our texts and images. In addition, our website can be found more easily on the Google search engine thanks to the embedded videos. Even if we place adver­ti­se­ments via Google Ads, thanks to the data collected, Google can really only show these adver­ti­se­ments to people who are inte­res­ted in our offers.

What data is stored by YouTube?

As soon as you visit one of our pages that has a YouTube video installed, YouTube sets at least one cookie that stores your IP address and our URL. If you are logged into your YouTube account, YouTube can mostly use cookies to associate your inter­ac­tions on our website with your profile. This includes data such as session duration, bounce rate, appro­xi­ma­te location, technical infor­ma­ti­on such as browser type, screen reso­lu­ti­on or your Internet provider. Other data can be contact details, any ratings, sharing content via social media or adding it to your favorites on YouTube.

If you are not signed into a Google account or a Youtube account, Google stores data with a unique iden­ti­fier asso­cia­ted with your device, browser or app. For example, your preferred language setting is retained. But a lot of inter­ac­tion data cannot be saved because fewer cookies are set.

In the following list we show cookies that were set in a test in the browser. On the one hand, we show cookies that are set without a regis­tered YouTube account. On the other hand, we show cookies that are set with a logged-in account. The list cannot claim to be complete because the user data always depends on the inter­ac­tions on YouTube.

Name: YSC
Value: b9-CV6o­jI5Y121955385‑1
Purpose: This cookie registers a unique ID to store sta­tis­tics of the video viewed.
Expiry date: after the end of the session

Name: PREF
Value: f1=50000000
Purpose: This cookie also registers your unique ID. Google receives sta­tis­tics from PREF on how you use YouTube videos on our website.
Expiry date: after 8 months

Name: GPS
Value: 1
Purpose: This cookie registers your unique ID on mobile devices to track GPS location.
Expiry date: after 30 minutes

Name: VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE
Value: 95Chz8bagyU
Purpose: This cookie tries to estimate the bandwidth of the user on our websites (with built-in YouTube video).
Expiry date: after 8 months

Other cookies that are set when you are logged in to your YouTube account:

Name: APISID
Value: zILlvClZ­SkqGs­SwI/AU1a­ZI6HY7121955385-
Purpose: This cookie is used to create a profile of your interests. The data is used for per­so­na­li­zed advertisements.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: CONSENT
Value: YES+AT.de+20150628–20‑0
Purpose: The cookie stores the status of a user’s consent to the use of various Google services. CONSENT is also used for security, to check users and protect user data from unaut­ho­ri­zed attacks.
Expiry date: after 19 years

Name: HSID
Value: AcRwpgUik9Dveht0I
Purpose: This cookie is used to create a profile of your interests. This data helps to display per­so­na­li­zed advertising.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: LOGIN_INFO
Value: AFmmF2swRQIhALLl6aL…
Purpose: Infor­ma­ti­on about your login data is stored in this cookie.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: SAPISID
Value: 7oaPxoG-pZs­Ju­uF5/A­nUd­DU­Is­J9i­J­z2vdM
Purpose: This cookie works by uniquely iden­ti­fy­ing your browser and device. It is used to create a profile of your interests.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: SID
Value: oQfNKjAsI121955385-
Purpose: This cookie stores your Google account ID and your last login time in a digitally signed and encrypted form.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: SIDCC
Value: AN0-TYuqub2JOcDTyL
Purpose: This cookie stores infor­ma­ti­on on how you use the website and which adver­ti­se­ments you may have seen before visiting our site.
Expiry date: after 3 months

How long and where is the data stored?

The data that YouTube receives from you and processes is stored on the Google servers. Most of these servers are located in America. Under https://www.google.com/about/datacenters/inside/locations/?hl=de See exactly where the Google data centers are located. Your data is dis­tri­bu­t­ed on the servers. This means that the data can be called up more quickly and is better protected against manipulation.

Google stores the collected data for different lengths of time. You can delete some data at any time, others are auto­ma­ti­cal­ly deleted after a limited period of time and others are stored by Google for a longer period of time. Some data (such as My Activity items, photos or documents, products) stored in your Google Account will remain stored until you delete it. Even if you’re not signed into a Google Account, you can delete some data asso­cia­ted with your device, browser, or app.

How can I delete my data or prevent data storage?

In principle, you can delete data in the Google account manually. With the automatic deletion of location and activity data intro­du­ced in 2019, infor­ma­ti­on is stored for either 3 or 18 months and then deleted, depending on your decision.

Regard­less of whether you have a Google account or not, you can configure your browser in such a way that Google cookies are deleted or deac­ti­va­ted. Depending on which browser you use, this works in different ways. Under the “Cookies” section you will find the relevant links to the relevant inst­ruc­tions for the most popular browsers.

If you generally do not want any cookies, you can set up your browser so that it always informs you when a cookie is to be set. You can decide for each indi­vi­du­al cookie whether you allow it or not.

Legal Basis

If you have agreed that your data can be processed and stored by inte­gra­ted YouTube elements, this consent is the legal basis for data pro­ces­sing (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. a DSGVO). In principle, your data will also be stored and processed on the basis of our legi­ti­ma­te interest (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. f GDPR) in quick and good com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on with you or other customers and business partners. However, we only use the inte­gra­ted YouTube elements if you have given your consent. YouTube also sets cookies in your browser to store data. We therefore recommend that you read our privacy statement on cookies carefully and consult the privacy statement or cookie policy of the relevant service provider.

YouTube also processes data in the USA, among other places. We would like to point out that, according to the European Court of Justice, there is currently no adequate level of pro­tec­tion for data transfer to the USA. This can be asso­cia­ted with various risks for the legality and security of data processing.

YouTube uses standard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­si­on (= Art. 46. Para. 2 and 3 GDPR). These clauses oblige YouTube to comply with EU data pro­tec­tion standards when pro­ces­sing relevant data outside of the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­men­ta­ti­on decision of the EU Com­mis­si­on. You can find the decision and the clauses here: https://germany.representation .ec.europa.eu/index_de.

Since YouTube is a sub­si­dia­ry of Google, there is a common privacy policy. If you want to learn more about how your data is handled, we recommend the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on at https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en.

YouTube Subscribe Button Privacy Policy

We have installed the YouTube subscribe button on our website. You can usually recognize the button by the classic YouTube logo. The logo shows the words “Subscribe” or “YouTube” in white letters on a red back­ground and the white “Play” symbol to the left of it. However, the button can also be shown in a different design.

Our YouTube channel always offers you funny, inte­res­ting or exciting videos. With the built-in “subscribe button” you can subscribe to our channel directly from our website and do not have to call up the YouTube website sepa­r­ate­ly. We want to make it as easy as possible for you to access our extensive content. Please note that this allows YouTube to store and process data from you.

If you see a built-in subscribe button on our site, YouTube sets at least one cookie, according to Google. This cookie stores your IP address and our URL. YouTube can also find out infor­ma­ti­on about your browser, your appro­xi­ma­te location and your default language in this way. In our test, the following four cookies were set without being logged in to YouTube:

Name: YSC
Value: b9-CV6ojI5121955385Y
Purpose: This cookie registers a unique ID to store sta­tis­tics of the video viewed.
Expiry date: after the end of the session

Name: PREF
Value: f1=50000000
Purpose: This cookie also registers your unique ID. Google receives sta­tis­tics from PREF on how you use YouTube videos on our website.
Expiry date: after 8 months

Name: GPS
Value: 1
Purpose: This cookie registers your unique ID on mobile devices to track GPS location.
Expiry date: after 30 minutes

Name: VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE
Value: 12195538595Chz8bagyU
Purpose: This cookie tries to estimate the bandwidth of the user on our websites (with built-in YouTube video).
Expiry date: after 8 months

Note: These cookies were set after a test and cannot claim to be complete.

If you are logged into your YouTube account, YouTube can store many of your actions/interactions on our website using cookies and assign them to your YouTube account. This gives YouTube infor­ma­ti­on, for example, on how long you surf our site, what type of browser you use, what screen reso­lu­ti­on you prefer, or what actions you take.

YouTube uses this data on the one hand to improve its own services and offers and on the other hand to provide analyzes and sta­tis­tics for adver­ti­sers (who use Google Ads).

Mis­cel­la­ne­ous introduction

Mis­cel­la­ne­ous Privacy Policy Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: Improve user experience
📓 Processed data: Which data is processed depends heavily on the services used. Usually it is an IP address and/or technical data. You can find more details on this under the respec­ti­ve tools used.
📅 Storage duration: depends on the tools used
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What is included in “Other”?

The “Other” category includes those services that do not fit into any of the above cate­go­ries. These are usually various plugins and inte­gra­ted elements that improve our website. As a rule, these functions are obtained from third parties and inte­gra­ted into our website. For example, these are web search services such as Algolia Place, Giphy, Pro­gramm­a­ble Search Engine or online services for weather data such as OpenWeather.

Why do we use other third parties?

We want to offer you the best web offer in our industry with our website. A website has long been more than just a business card for a company. Rather, it’s a place designed to help you find what you’re looking for. In order to make our website even more inte­res­ting and helpful for you, we use various third-party services.

What data is processed?

Whenever elements are inte­gra­ted into our website, your IP address will be trans­mit­ted to the respec­ti­ve provider, stored and processed there. This is necessary because otherwise the content will not be sent to your browser and will not be displayed accord­in­gly. It may also happen that service providers also use pixel tags or web beacons. These are small graphics on websites that can record a log file and also create analyzes of this file. With the infor­ma­ti­on received, the providers can improve their own marketing measures. In addition to pixel tags, such infor­ma­ti­on (such as which button you click or when you access which page) can also be stored in cookies. In addition to analysis data on your web behavior, technical infor­ma­ti­on such as your browser type or operating system can also be stored there. Some providers can also link the data obtained to other internal services or to third-party providers. Each provider handles your data dif­fer­ent­ly. We therefore recommend that you carefully read the data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­ons of the respec­ti­ve services. We make every effort to only use services that deal very carefully with the issue of data protection.

Duration of data processing

We will inform you below about the duration of data pro­ces­sing if we have further infor­ma­ti­on on this. In general, we only process personal data for as long as is abso­lute­ly necessary for the provision of our services and products.

Legal Basis

If we ask for your consent and you also agree that we may use the service, this is the legal basis for the pro­ces­sing of your data (Article 6 (1) (a) GDPR). In addition to consent, we have a legi­ti­ma­te interest in analyzing the behavior of website visitors and thus improving our offer tech­ni­cal­ly and eco­no­mi­c­al­ly. The legal basis for this is Article 6 (1) (f) GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests). However, we only use the tools if you have given your consent.

Infor­ma­ti­on on the special tools, if available, can be found in the following sections.

Google Fonts privacy policy

Google Fonts Privacy Policy Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: Opti­miz­a­ti­on of our service
📓 Data processed: data such as IP address and CSS and font requests
More details can be found below in this data pro­tec­tion declaration.
📅 Storage duration: Font files are stored on Google for one year
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What are Google Fonts?

We use Google Fonts on our website. These are the “Google fonts” from Google Inc. The company Google Ireland Limited (Gordon House, Barrow Street Dublin 4, Ireland) is respon­si­ble for all Google services in Europe.

You do not need to register or enter a password to use Google fonts. Fur­ther­mo­re, no cookies are stored in your browser. The files (CSS, typefaces/fonts) are requested via the Google domains fonts.googleapis.com and fonts.gstatic.com. According to Google, requests for CSS and fonts are com­ple­te­ly separate from all other Google services. If you have a Google account, you don’t have to worry about your Google account data being trans­mit­ted to Google while using Google Fonts. Google records the use of CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and the fonts used and stores this data securely. How the data storage looks exactly, we will look at in detail.
Google Fonts (formerly Google Web Fonts) is a directory of over 800 fonts that Google gives to its users for free provide.

Many of these fonts are released under the SIL Open Font License, while others have been released under the Apache License. Both are free software licenses.

Why do we use Google Fonts on our website?

With Google Fonts we can use fonts on our own website and do not have to upload them to our own server. Google Fonts is an important component in keeping the quality of our website high. All Google fonts are auto­ma­ti­cal­ly optimized for the web and this saves data volume and is a great advantage espe­cial­ly for use with mobile devices. When you visit our site, the small file size ensures fast loading time. Fur­ther­mo­re, Google Fonts are secure web fonts. Different image synthesis systems (rendering) in different browsers, operating systems and mobile devices can lead to errors. Such errors can partially distort texts or entire websites. Thanks to the fast Content Delivery Network (CDN), there are no cross-platform problems with Google Fonts. Google Fonts supports all major browsers (Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Opera) and works reliably on most modern mobile operating systems, including Android 2.2+ and iOS 4.2+ (iPhone, iPad, iPod). So we use Google Fonts so that we can present our entire online service as beau­ti­ful­ly and uniformly as possible.

What data is stored by Google?

When you visit our website, the fonts are reloaded via a Google server. This external call transmits data to the Google servers. In this way, Google also reco­gni­zes that you or your IP address is visiting our website. The Google Fonts API was designed to reduce the use, storage and collec­tion of end-user data to what is necessary for proper font delivery. Inci­dent­al­ly, API stands for “App­li­ca­ti­on Pro­gramming Interface” and serves, among other things, as a data trans­mit­ter in the software sector.
Google Fonts securely stores CSS and font requests on Google and is therefore protected. The collected usage figures allow Google to determine how well the indi­vi­du­al fonts are received. Google publishes the results on internal analysis pages, such as Google Analytics. Google also uses data from its own web crawler to determine which websites use Google fonts. This data is published in the Google Fonts BigQuery database. Entre­pre­neurs and deve­lo­pers use the Google web service BigQuery to examine and move large amounts of data.

It should be noted, however, that every Google Font request also auto­ma­ti­cal­ly transmits infor­ma­ti­on such as language settings, IP address, browser version, browser screen reso­lu­ti­on and browser name to the Google servers. Whether this data is also stored cannot be clearly deter­mi­ned or is not clearly com­mu­ni­ca­ted by Google.

How long and where is the data stored?

Google stores requests for CSS assets for one day on its servers, which are mainly located outside the EU. This enables us to use the fonts using a Google style sheet. A style sheet is a template that you can use to quickly and easily change the design or font of a website, for example.

The font files are stored by Google for one year. Google is thus pursuing the goal of fun­da­ment­al­ly improving the loading time of websites. When millions of websites refer to the same fonts, they are cached after the first visit and immedia­te­ly reappear on all other websites visited later. Sometimes Google updates font files to reduce file size, increase language coverage, and improve design.

How can I delete my data or prevent data storage?

The data that Google stores for a day or a year cannot simply be deleted. The data is auto­ma­ti­cal­ly trans­mit­ted to Google when the page is accessed. In order to be able to delete this data pre­ma­tu­re­ly, you must contact Google Support at https://support.google.com/ Contact ?hl=de&tid=121955385. In this case, you only prevent data storage if you do not visit our site.

Unlike other web fonts, Google allows us unlimited access to all fonts. So we have unlimited access to a sea of ​​fonts and thus get the best out of our website. You can find more about Google Fonts and other questions at https://developers.google.com/fonts/faq?tid= 121955385. Although Google addresses data pro­tec­tion issues there, it does not contain really detailed infor­ma­ti­on about data storage. It is rela­tively difficult to get really precise infor­ma­ti­on about stored data from Google.

Legal Basis

If you have consented to the use of Google Fonts, the legal basis for the cor­re­spon­ding data pro­ces­sing is this consent. According to Article 6(1)(a) GDPR (consent), this consent repres­ents the legal basis for the pro­ces­sing of personal data, as may occur when it is collected by Google Fonts.

We also have a legi­ti­ma­te interest in using Google Font to optimize our online service. The cor­re­spon­ding legal basis for this is Art. 6 Paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests). However, we only use Google Fonts if you have given your consent.

Google also processes your data in the USA, among other places. We would like to point out that, according to the European Court of Justice, there is currently no adequate level of pro­tec­tion for data transfer to the USA. This can be asso­cia­ted with various risks for the legality and security of data processing.

As the basis for data pro­ces­sing by reci­pi­ents based in third countries (outside the European Union, Iceland, Liech­ten­stein, Norway, i.e. in par­ti­cu­lar in the USA) or data transfer there, Google uses so-called standard con­trac­tu­al clauses (= Art. 46 Para. 2 and 3 DSGVO). Standard Con­trac­tu­al Clauses (SCC) are templates provided by the EU Com­mis­si­on and are intended to ensure that your data also comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards if they are trans­fer­red to third countries (such as the USA) and stored there. Through these clauses, Google under­ta­kes to comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards when pro­ces­sing your relevant data, even if the data is stored, processed and managed in the USA. These clauses are based on an imple­men­ta­ti­on decision of the EU Com­mis­si­on. You can find the decision and the cor­re­spon­ding standard con­trac­tu­al clauses here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/dec_impl/2021/914/oj?locale=de

The Google Ads Data Pro­ces­sing Terms, which also cor­re­spond to the standard con­trac­tu­al clauses for Google Fonts, can be found at https://business.safety.google/adsprocessorterms/.

You can also find out which data is generally collected by Google and what this data is used for at https://www. google.com/intl/de/policies/privacy/.

Google Fonts Local Privacy Policy

On our website we use Google Fonts from Google Inc. The company Google Ireland Limited (Gordon House, Barrow Street Dublin 4, Ireland) is respon­si­ble for the European area. We have inte­gra­ted the Google fonts locally, i.e. on our web server — not on the Google servers. As a result, there is no con­nec­tion to Google servers and therefore no data trans­mis­si­on or storage.

What are Google Fonts?

Google Fonts used to be called Google Web Fonts. This is an inter­ac­ti­ve directory of over 800 fonts that Google provides for free. With Google Fonts, you could use fonts without uploading them to your own server. However, in order to prevent any transfer of infor­ma­ti­on to Google servers in this regard, we have down­loa­ded the fonts to our server. In this way, we act in com­pli­an­ce with data pro­tec­tion and do not send any data to Google Fonts.

Google Maps privacy policy

Google Maps Privacy Policy Summary

👥 Affected: Visitors to the website
🤝 Purpose: Opti­miz­a­ti­on of our service
📓 Processed data: Data such as entered search terms, your IP address and also the latitude and longitude coordinates.
More details can be found below in this data pro­tec­tion declaration.
📅 Storage duration: depends on the stored data
⚖️ Legal bases: Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Article 6 paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests)

What is Google Maps?

We use Google Maps from Google Inc. on our website. The company Google Ireland Limited (Gordon House, Barrow Street Dublin 4, Ireland) is respon­si­ble for all Google services in Europe. With Google Maps we can show you locations better and thus adapt our service to your needs. By using Google Maps, data is trans­mit­ted to Google and stored on the Google servers. Here we want to go into more detail about what Google Maps is, why we use this Google service, what data is stored and how you can prevent this.

Google Maps is an Internet map service from Google. With Google Maps, you can find the exact location of a city, attrac­tion, lodging or business online using a PC, tablet or app. If companies are repre­sen­ted on Google My Business, addi­tio­nal infor­ma­ti­on about the company is displayed in addition to the location. In order to show how to get there, map sections of a location can be inte­gra­ted into a website using HTML code. Google Maps shows the earth’s surface as a street map or as an aerial or satellite image. Thanks to the Street View images and the high-quality satellite images, very precise repre­sen­ta­ti­ons are possible.

Why do we use Google Maps on our website?

All of our efforts on this site aim to offer you a useful and mea­ning­ful time on our website. By inte­gra­ting Google Maps, we can provide you with the most important infor­ma­ti­on about various locations. You can see at a glance where we have our company head­quar­ters. The route descrip­ti­on always shows you the best or fastest way to us. You can get direc­tions for routes by car, public transport, on foot or by bike. For us, providing Google Maps is part of our customer service.

What data is stored by Google Maps?

In order for Google Maps to be able to fully offer its service, the company must collect and store data from you. This includes, among other things, the search terms entered, your IP address and also the latitude and longitude coor­di­na­tes. If you use the route planner function, the start address entered will also be saved. However, this data storage happens on the Google Maps website. We can only inform you about this, but have no influence. Since we have inte­gra­ted Google Maps into our website, Google sets at least one cookie (name: NID) in your browser. This cookie stores data about your user behavior. Google uses this data primarily to optimize its own services and to provide you with indi­vi­du­al, per­so­na­li­zed advertising.

The following cookie is set in your browser due to the inte­gra­ti­on of Google Maps:

Name: NID
Value: 188=h26c1Ktha7fCQTx8rXgLyATyITJ121955385‑5
Purpose: NID is used by Google to adapt adver­ti­se­ments to your Google search. With the help of the cookie, Google “remembers” your most fre­quent­ly entered search queries or your previous inter­ac­tion with ads. So you always get tailor-made adver­ti­se­ments. The cookie contains a unique ID that Google uses to collect your personal pre­fe­ren­ces for adver­ti­sing purposes.
Expiry date: after 6 months

Note: We cannot guarantee the com­ple­teness of the stored data. Changes can never be ruled out, espe­cial­ly when using cookies. In order to identify the cookie NID, a separate test page was created, where only Google Maps was integrated.

How long and where is the data stored?

Google servers are located in data centers around the world. However, most of the servers are located in America. For this reason, your data is also incre­a­singly stored in the USA. Here you can read exactly where the Google data centers are located: https://www.google.com/ about/datacenters/inside/locations/?hl=de

Google dis­tri­bu­tes the data on different data carriers. As a result, the data can be called up more quickly and is better protected against any attempts at mani­pu­la­ti­on. Each data center also has special emergency programs. If, for example, there are problems with the Google hardware or a natural disaster paralyzes the servers, the data will almost certainly remain protected.

Google stores some data for a fixed period of time. For other data, Google only offers the option of manually deleting it. The company also anony­mi­zes infor­ma­ti­on (such as adver­ti­sing data) in server logs by deleting part of the IP address and cookie infor­ma­ti­on after 9 and 18 months, respectively.

How can I delete my data or prevent data storage?

With the automatic deletion of location and activity data intro­du­ced in 2019, infor­ma­ti­on on location deter­mi­na­ti­on and web/app activity is stored for either 3 or 18 months – depending on your decision – and then deleted. You can also manually delete this data from the history at any time via the Google account. If you want to com­ple­te­ly prevent your location tracking, you need to pause the “Web and app activity” section in the Google account. Click “Data and Per­so­na­liz­a­ti­on” and then click the “Activity Settings” option. Here you can switch the acti­vi­ties on or off.

You can also deac­ti­va­te, delete or manage indi­vi­du­al cookies in your browser. Depending on which browser you use, this always works a little dif­fer­ent­ly. Under the “Cookies” section you will find the relevant links to the relevant inst­ruc­tions for the most popular browsers.

If you generally do not want any cookies, you can set up your browser so that it always informs you when a cookie is to be set. You can decide for each indi­vi­du­al cookie whether you allow it or not.

Legal Basis

If you have consented to the use of Google Maps, the legal basis for the cor­re­spon­ding data pro­ces­sing is this consent. According to Article 6(1)(a) GDPR (consent), this consent repres­ents the legal basis for the pro­ces­sing of personal data, as may occur when it is collected by Google Maps.

We also have a legi­ti­ma­te interest in using Google Maps to optimize our online service. The cor­re­spon­ding legal basis for this is Art. 6 Paragraph 1 lit. f GDPR (legi­ti­ma­te interests). However, we only use Google Maps if you have given your consent.

Google also processes your data in the USA, among other places. We would like to point out that, according to the European Court of Justice, there is currently no adequate level of pro­tec­tion for data transfer to the USA. This can be asso­cia­ted with various risks for the legality and security of data processing.

As the basis for data pro­ces­sing by reci­pi­ents based in third countries (outside the European Union, Iceland, Liech­ten­stein, Norway, i.e. in par­ti­cu­lar in the USA) or data transfer there, Google uses so-called standard con­trac­tu­al clauses (= Art. 46 Para. 2 and 3 DSGVO). Standard Con­trac­tu­al Clauses (SCC) are templates provided by the EU Com­mis­si­on and are intended to ensure that your data also comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards if they are trans­fer­red to third countries (such as the USA) and stored there. Through these clauses, Google under­ta­kes to comply with European data pro­tec­tion standards when pro­ces­sing your relevant data, even if the data is stored, processed and managed in the USA. These clauses are based on an imple­men­ta­ti­on decision of the EU Com­mis­si­on. You can find the decision and the cor­re­spon­ding standard con­trac­tu­al clauses here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/dec_impl/2021/914/oj?locale=de

The Google Ads Data Pro­ces­sing Terms, which cor­re­spond to the standard con­trac­tu­al clauses, can be found at https ://business.safety.google/adsprocessorterms/.

If you want to learn more about data pro­ces­sing by Google, we recommend the company’s own data pro­tec­tion decla­ra­ti­on at https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en.
All texts are copyrighted.

Source: Created with the Privacy Policy Generator by AdSimple

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